Loading...
You are here:  Home  >  Calendar >  Rainstorms Wash Away Drought in More than 90 Percent of California

Rainstorms Wash Away Drought in More than 90 Percent of California

By   /  March 3, 2017  /  No Comments

    Print    

The report noted improved conditions in the San Joaquin Valley, the coastal range to Santa Barbara County and Southern California.

“Basically, 95 percent of California was in some form of drought at this time last year,” said NBC4 forecaster Crystal Egger. “It’s incredible progress. We’ve had a fantastic season.”

Santa Barbara County’s Lake Cachuma, which has been slow to recover from the dry spell, was a 45 percent to capacity compared to 42 percent one week ago. The area northwest of Los Angeles and extreme southeastern California are the only parts of the state still in severe drought this week, according to the Drought Monitor.

The report comes a day after water resource managers said the Sierra Nevada snow pack is close to setting records notched more than three decades ago.

The report noted improved conditions in the San Joaquin Valley, the coastal range to Santa Barbara County and Southern California.

Santa Barbara County’s Lake Cachuma, which has been slow to recover from the dry spell, was a 45 percent to capacity compared to 42 percent one week ago. The area northwest of Los Angeles and extreme southeastern California are the only parts of the state still in severe drought this week, accoding to the Drought Monitor.

The report comes a day after water resource managers said the Sierra Nevada snowpack is close to setting records notched more than three decades ago.

It’s all welcome news after five years of punishing drought, including the driest year in California’s recorded history.

A series of storms that doused the state in the first two months of the year brought the water content of the snow pack up to a “pretty phenomenal” 185 percent of normal, well above the 84 percent of normal a year ago, said Frank Gehrke, the state’s chief snow surveyor. Winter snowfall on the 400-mile mountain range provides roughly one-third of the water used in the nation’s most populous state as the snow melts over the spring and summer and fills reservoirs supplying farmers and city dwellers.

Gehrke said the snowpack is nearing levels last seen in 1983. He noted that levels reached by April 1 are a key marker because that’s the typical end to the wet season.

“We’ve busted through April 1 values pretty much at all snow courses throughout the state,” Gehrke said.

 

    Print    

Do you want more news like this? We're supported by our subscribers and readers!

About the author

Founder

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You might also like...

Thy Kingdom Come – Part Two – Thomas Calabrese

Read More →